YAJNASENI THE STORY OF DRAUPADI PDF

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The story of Draupadi, one of the most fascinating characters in the Mahabharata. Strange as it may appear, Draupadi, the most accomplished heroine of the. Get this from a library! Yajnaseni: the story of Draupadi. [Pratibhā Rāẏa; Pradip Bhattacharya] -- Epistolary novel about Draupadī, Hindu mythological character. In Swargarohana Parva, Draupadi attains the heaven along with the Pandavas. In the novel Yajnaseni: The story of Draupadi, Pratibha Ray chooses to narrate.


Yajnaseni The Story Of Draupadi Pdf

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Indian sensibility is intrinsically shaped as well as nourished by religion and mythology. Mahabharata and Ramayana, the preservers of tradition and spirituality. Yajnaseni: A Synonym of Indian Woman . Fables, parables, allegories— all surrounded with the stories of Gods and deities, even Yajnaseni or Draupadi. By Pratibha Ray. The tale of Draupadi, some of the most interesting characters within the Mahabharata. Strange because it might seem.

Feminist Perspectives in the novel Yajnaseni of Pratibha Rai

Despite being a tale told from a female perspective, this is basically an anti-feminist work in my evaluation. Draupadi constantly endures hardship because of her gender, and what is expected of her as the royal wife of the 5 Pandavas.

She doesn't get to choose who to marry, and is forced into a polygamous marriage which she doesn't initially want either. Throughout the story she is forced to live in the forest, forced into a scheduled mating pattern with her 5 husbands, has her children killed in a war due to the actions of her husbands, is humiliated in court due to her oldest husband's gambling her away as an article of property, etc etc etc.

She bears all of this willingly, and even lovingly. She is the epitome of the "good Hindu wife". She worships her husbands particularly Arjuna literally as Gods. Now, it would be one thing if the story was written for us to see this and say "What a tragic character!

She had to endure all of this abuse because of the faulty moral beliefs of her day. If only she could have broken out of that paradigm and seen her own enslavement. Her obedience and submission IE her adherence to her wifely Dharma regardless of any of the consequences is supposed to be admired.

There is a much better moral model in the story: Karna. But before I get to that, here are some quotes relating to Draupadi to illustrate what Im talking about: Draupadi: "I have made an offering of my life to keep the five Pandavas bound together"!!!!!! I try not to be envious under any circumstances…. I never eat or lie down before my husbands eat or lie down.

I am up before they get up.

I am never lazy in their work. If they return from a long journey, I keep seat, water, food, resting place ready for them. Despite servants being available, I keep watch on household chores. I cook their favorite food myself and serve it with my own hands. I do not burden them with my own worried and anxieties. Rather, participating in their concerns, I offer my views.

She worships her husbands particularly Arjuna literally as Gods. Now, it would be one thing if the story was written for us to see this and say "What a tragic character!

She had to endure all of this abuse because of the faulty moral beliefs of her day. If only she could have broken out of that paradigm and seen her own enslavement. Her obedience and submission IE her adherence to her wifely Dharma regardless of any of the consequences is supposed to be admired.

There is a much better moral model in the story: Karna. But before I get to that, here are some quotes relating to Draupadi to illustrate what Im talking about: Draupadi: "I have made an offering of my life to keep the five Pandavas bound together"!!!!!! I try not to be envious under any circumstances….

I never eat or lie down before my husbands eat or lie down. I am up before they get up. I am never lazy in their work. If they return from a long journey, I keep seat, water, food, resting place ready for them.

Despite servants being available, I keep watch on household chores. I cook their favorite food myself and serve it with my own hands. I do not burden them with my own worried and anxieties.

Rather, participating in their concerns, I offer my views. I do not spend too much time on toilet, bath and dressing.

If my husbands are far away, I refrain from decorating myself. I do not make interest in mattes which they dislike.

Without their having to tell me I am able to sense their likes and dislikes. I am never interested in arguing fruitlessly or in rolling about in meaningless mirth. The most important thing is that I never doubt them, nor do i ever shower them with unnecessary compliments. Ray, 4. As a modern woman, Draupadi unfolds the inner life of a woman and questions the patriarch social evils of contemporary society. Daughter of King Drupad, Draupadi, has been subjected to serious insults during her life time.

It is true in the case of Devi Sita in the age of Ramayan and it is again the same thing for Draupadi in the DwaparaYuga. Sita was apparently put to repeated tests and had to bear unimaginable humiliation only for the establishment of dharma.

Draupadi: A Woman of Rare Love.

She ultimately surrendered herself to the lap of mother earth to escape all these earthly agonies. Draupadi like Devi Sita has taken birth to establish dharma and destroy the evil powers. Her birth, like Devi Sita, is not any ordinary birth as she is born from the sacrificial fire of Yajna. She is completely unknown to all these grand www.

The Last Mrs Parrish

It is her Sakha Lord Krishna who reminds her the grand plan of God for the protection of dharma on the earth. Yajnaseni has always been treated in an undignified manner. Here it is clear that females are always considered as play things by their husbands in all ages. Yudhishtir never seeks her consent before losing her in the dice game.

Duryadhana orders Yajnaseni to come to the assembly hall and Duhshashan goes to bring her using very abusive language which is painful for Yajnaseni.

Being a woman did I not have right even over myself, my own self? If they had rights over his body of mine, did it mean they could do as they wished with me? Finally Duhshasan overpowers her and drags her to the assembly hall.

Yajnaseni narrates this physical assault on her in the following words: As the wild buffalo drags some broken creeper along, similarly Duhshasan dragged me to the assembly-hall. With great difficulty I tried to cover my breasts with my single garment. The end of it had slipped off my head. Face, neck, arms were all bare.

The hair in disarray. Out of Kindness they had covered my bare back from the sight of spectators. Like a creeper trembling in a storm, I was shivering with fear and shame. Ray, Yajnaseni, the queen of five pandavas, pleads for mercy: Let me remain alone in private.

He says: Even the gods have prescribed one husband for a woman. But by accepting five husbands she has discarded her modesty, shame and womanhood.Draupadi was extremely beautiful, intelligent and virtuous woman, with her body smelling like a fresh bloom lotus.

Yajnaseni: The Story of Draupadi

If my husbands are far away, I refrain from decorating myself. Further on he saw the floor shining wih high polish and thought it was a pond; so he lifted up his clothing that it may not get wet. Dushasana drags Draupadi to the court by the hair.

This vessel would not become empty until Draupadi's meal was over. The sect believes that Draupadi is the incarnation of goddess Kali.

Polyandry was but common in the royal class but under the strict guidance of the Vedic sages exactly like polygamous marriages of ancient Indian kings were under strict supervision and guidance of the Vedic laws and Vedic sages. Finally he and his four brothers became the slaves of the Kaurava king. Karna calling her a public woman whose being clothed or naked is immaterial.

She is also called Krishnaa because she was copper skinned, fiery eyed and had long, black hair.